Research Areas

Our graduate program has three core areas of specialization: (1) Communication and Cognition, (2) Political Communication, and (3) Computational Communication. These research areas dovetail conceptually in important ways. Collectively, we investigate communicative processes at many levels of analysis. The study of low-level processing of multimodal information is important not only in ordinary social interaction, but also in understanding how people interface with digital media and computers. Many important aspects of digital media and political communication also involve high-level analysis of big data patterns. Our faculty have expertise in these overlapping scholarly domains. Below are brief descriptions of the areas, and the faculty members who can act as primary advisors for graduate students.

Communication and Cognition centers on the cognitive and perceptual processes involved in dyadic and small group interpersonal communication.

  • Greg Bryant
  • Rick Dale
  • Tao Gao
  • Martie Haselton
  • Kerri Johnson
  • Steve Stroessner
  • Anne Warlaumont

 

Political Communication is concerned with the processes and effects of institutional, political, and mass media communications and institutions, their historical development and their legal, regulatory, policy and economic aspects.

  • Tim Groeling
  • Jungseock Joo
  • Georgia Kernell
  • Stuart Soroka

 

Computational Communication involves the study of communication mediated by computer technology in both mass and interpersonal contexts.

  • Mario Biagioli
  • Rick Dale
  • Tao Gao
  • Jungseock Joo
  • PJ Lamberson
  • Francis Steen
  • Anne Warlaumont